Difference between revisions of "Daoist Music"

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==Definition==
 
==Definition==
 
Daoist music, or Daoist Ritual Music( 道場音樂 Daochang Yinyue ), is the music used in the Daoist activities of Fasts and Offerings ( 齋醮 Zhaijiao ). Its formation and development are closely related to the ancient cult music and the popular music of various regions, so it is religious music with Chinese characteristics and a major part of the Chinese traditional music culture.  
 
Daoist music, or Daoist Ritual Music( 道場音樂 Daochang Yinyue ), is the music used in the Daoist activities of Fasts and Offerings ( 齋醮 Zhaijiao ). Its formation and development are closely related to the ancient cult music and the popular music of various regions, so it is religious music with Chinese characteristics and a major part of the Chinese traditional music culture.  

Revision as of 11:15, 16 September 2009


Daoist Music
Classification and Forms of Daoist Music
Vocal Music
Instrumental Music
Musical Instruments
Schools of Daoist Music
Music of the Orthodox Oneness Tradition
Music of the Complete Perfection Tradition
Compilations of Daoist Music Scores
The Ritual of Jade Tunes
The Daoist Musical Scores Composed by Imperial Order during the Great Ming Dynasty
The Orthodox Rhythm of the Complete Perfection Tradition
Daoist Music of Different Places
The White Cloud Temple, Beijing Suzhou Mt Longhu
Mt Wudang Mt Mao Shanghai
Mt Lao Shanxi Plain Sichuan
The Northeast Taiwan Hong Kong

Definition

Daoist music, or Daoist Ritual Music( 道場音樂 Daochang Yinyue ), is the music used in the Daoist activities of Fasts and Offerings ( 齋醮 Zhaijiao ). Its formation and development are closely related to the ancient cult music and the popular music of various regions, so it is religious music with Chinese characteristics and a major part of the Chinese traditional music culture.

Origins

Daoist music originates from Shamans ( 巫 Wu ) and Invocators ( 祝 Zhu ), and inherits the tradition that "shamans make spirits descend by singing and dancing". Simultaneously, Daoism attaches importance to prayer cult, i.e. the so-called Altar Offerings ( 壇醮 Tanjiao ). It continually absorbs music from the rites held in imperial temples, as well as music from popular cults to enrich its own religious activities. Thus the Daoist music with the expression of immortalist belief as its core, was gradually formed. Almost all the ritual offerings are accompanied by music. Daoist music has become one of the traditional ways of preaching.

Content and characteristics

Though Daoist music has the expression of immortalist belief as its main content, it did not develop independently. During the process of its development, many social aspects, especially court music and local popular music, have influenced it. Therefore, Daoist music has three major characteristics. Firstly, Daoist music is closely associated with rituals of fasts and offerings and is heavily tinged with religious characteristics. Secondly, since those worshiped are mostly heavenly spirits such as the Emperor of Heaven ( 天帝 Tiandi ), and the music is solemn and respectful, Daoist music absorbs many rhythms and tunes from the cult music of the court. Thirdly, due to the wide penetration of Daoism among the people and the mixing of Daoist music and local music in various places over a long time, to a certain extent Daoist music has features of traditional popular music and local music.